Navigate Up
Sign In
Travel Resources
Japan
Approx. Time Difference
Apr - Nov: + 16 hrs
Dec – Mar: + 17 hrs
Japan Universities - Hitotsubashi Univ.


This guide was created to help you navigate the different aspects of travelling abroad as a UCEAP student. All important aspects of attending university in your host country are addressed here, including academic information, extension of UCEAP participation, cultural awareness, orientation, transportation, finances and much more.

Remember to also visit the Participants section of the UCEAP website for important information and deadlines.
Click a heading below to see section content.
Your UCEAP Network
 
 
 
 
Academic Information
Program Overview
 

Requirements

  • Summer ILP: 3 to 12 UC quarter/2 to 8 UC semester units; letter grade only
  • 18 UC quarter/12 UC semester units per semester; usually 5 to 7 courses

Units

UC quarter units are calculated by multiplying Hitotsubashi units by 1.5. (2.0 Hitotsubashi units equal 3.0 UC quarter units).  Many Hitotsubashi courses have low unit values (3 UC quarter units).

Academic Culture
 
 
Course Information
​UCEAP students at Hitotsubashi study primarily in the social sciences, law, business, and economics, although other fields are available. Native or near-native Japanese fluency is required. Coursework is taught in Japanese.
 
International students at Hitotsubashi become members of the main student body. With the exception of a Japanese language program, the university offers a very limited number of courses exclusively for international students.
 
A special feature of Hitotsubashi is the zemi (seminar) system. Zemi is an abbreviation of the German pronunciation of seminar, on which the Japanese model is based. The zemi system differs from Japanese higher education’s usual focus on mass education. To participate, you must have a clear academic focus within the social sciences and Japanese language proficiency at the intermediate level or higher.
 
All Hitotsubashi students are required to participate in seminars, which encourage individual development and expression as well as foster close and often lifelong personal relationships among students and faculty members. Eligible students may affiliate with one of the zemi for intensive academic training.
 
The zemi is a year-long course taken consecutively in the junior and senior years. Most have 10 to 15 students, some popular zemi may hold up to 25 students. Students study under one professor who acts as academic advisor, mentor, and instructor.
 
The zemi goes beyond academic instruction; it often develops into a close-knit, communal group for social life in Japan. The concept that a zemi is a place for personal development as well as academic training has been a tradition over the generations. In addition to academic work, zemi members enjoy a variety of activities together both on and off campus.
Internships & Volunteer Opportunities
 
Grades
Discuss questions related to grades or other classroom matters and appropriate plans for handling them with the UCEAP Study Center. It is not the Japanese custom for instructors to give detailed comments on written work and final papers, and exams are not usually returned; the grade itself is generally considered appropriate and adequate feedback. You may inquire about your progress in a class, but do not discuss grades with your professors unless invited to do so; otherwise, it may appear that you are trying to negotiate your grade, which is frowned upon.
 
Beware of rumors about lenient grading at Japanese institutions. Some universities are similar to UC in their standards and grading system. Language courses in particular can be more demanding than at UC and the grading is often rigorous. In many cases, poor grades are the result of excessive absences, tardiness, missing assignments, and lack of communication between UC students and instructors. Grading is typically conducted by detracting points for errors, rather than rewarding points for correct work. If you experience difficulties with your language courses, inquire with the Study Center for tutoring assistance. Also beware of being influenced by the rigor—or lack thereof—with which Japanese students appear to be engaged in their studies. In contrast to UC students, Japanese students often place less emphasis on letter grades and more on merely passing their courses.
 
To avoid a failing grade for a dropped course:
  • Keep the Study Center informed of any changes in course selection at the host university.
  • Follow UCEAP procedures for dropping a course
Final grades for this program are usually available in late October. 
For more information about grades, see the Academic Information chapter of the UCEAP Guide to Study Abroad.
Extending UCEAP Participation
Cultural Awareness
Educational Resources
 
Social Conduct
 
Drugs, Alcohol and Smoking
 
Official Start Date & Mandatory Orientation
 
 
Travel Planning
Travel to Your Host Country
 
Travel Documents
 
Packing Tips
 
Insurance for Personal Possessions
 
Financial Information
Understanding Your Finances
 
Your MyEAP Account & Budget
 
 
Handling Money Abroad
 
Scholarships and Fellowships
 
Communications Abroad
Internet Access
 
Phones
 
 
Mail & Shipments
 
Housing & Meals
Intensive Language Program (ILP) Housing
 
Hitotsubashi University Housing
Undergraduates stay in International Village in Kodaira while graduate students stay in International House on the Kunitachi campus.  International House has 54 single rooms for international students with shared showers, kitchen, and lounge area.
 
The International Village residence complex consists of five dorm buildings, a guest house, research centers, and a spacious cafeteria. It houses both Japanese and international students from local universities in the area. It is located about 30 minutes from the Hitotsubashi campus by bike or train. The single rooms have private toilets; kitchen and shower facilities are shared.
 

At a Glance

  • You cannot choose which dormitory or room you will be placed in. You will live in either the International House (graduates) or the International Village (undergraduates).
  •  
  • You will open a Japanese bank account after arrival in Japan. The rent will be automatically deducted every month from your Japanese bank account. See the UCEAP Student Budget for estimated housing costs.
     
  • All rooms are equipped for Internet access. To access Internet in the room, you must sign a private contract with a service provider. You are responsible for your own Internet bill. It may take a few weeks to set up the Internet service for your room.
  •  
  • There are phones in the rooms that can be used free of charge to make room to room calls within the dormitory. You are responsible for the cost of all outside calls.
  •  
  • Cooking is not permitted in individual rooms, but there are shared kitchens. You can also eat at the university cafeteria and in nearby restaurants.
  •  
  • Linens are available for rent. You can continue to rent or you can buy your own linens after arrival.
Meals
 
Other Housing Options
    
 
Daily Life Abroad

While in Japan, students with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different from what they are in the United States. Although Japan’s accessibility laws mandate that new construction projects for public use include provisions for persons with disabilities, older buildings are not likely to have been retrofitted for accessibility. At major train stations, airports, and hotels, students with disabilities should encounter few accessibility problems. Accessibility at other public facilities continues to improve through the installation of elevators and wheelchair ramps. Many smaller stations are inaccessible to those who cannot climb stairs.
 
Accommodations and services cannot be provided if students choose not to, or fail to, follow the established UCEAP procedures in a timely manner. Accommodations and services cannot be guaranteed and are individualized, based upon the student's documentation provided through the UC campus Disability Services Office (DSO). The letter must be on UC DSO letterhead and issued for the specific term and UCEAP program/country.  Accommodations and services can be revisited as needed, but they are not retroactive and cannot be facilitated, if available abroad, if procedures are not followed with reasonable, advanced notice.  It is the student's responsibility to ensure that any funding required for special services abroad is arranged in advance. For more information refer to the UCEAP Guide to Study Abroad, Students with Disabilities section.​

While in Japan, students with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different from what they are in the United States. Although Japan’s accessibility laws mandate that new construction projects for public use include provisions for persons with disabilities, older buildings are not likely to have been retrofitted for accessibility. At major train stations, airports, and hotels, students with disabilities should encounter few accessibility problems. Accessibility at other public facilities continues to improve through the installation of elevators and wheelchair ramps. Many smaller stations are inaccessible to those who cannot climb stairs.
 
Accommodations and services cannot be provided if students choose not to, or fail to, follow the established UCEAP procedures in a timely manner. Accommodations and services cannot be guaranteed and are individualized, based upon the student's documentation provided through the UC campus Disability Services Office (DSO). The letter must be on UC DSO letterhead and issued for the specific term and UCEAP program/country.  Accommodations and services can be revisited as needed, but they are not retroactive and cannot be facilitated, if available abroad, if procedures are not followed with reasonable, advanced notice.  It is the student's responsibility to ensure that any funding required for special services abroad is arranged in advance. For more information refer to the UCEAP Guide to Study Abroad, Students with Disabilities section.​

While in Japan, students with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different from what they are in the United States. Although Japan’s accessibility laws mandate that new construction projects for public use include provisions for persons with disabilities, older buildings are not likely to have been retrofitted for accessibility. At major train stations, airports, and hotels, students with disabilities should encounter few accessibility problems. Accessibility at other public facilities continues to improve through the installation of elevators and wheelchair ramps. Many smaller stations are inaccessible to those who cannot climb stairs.
 
Accommodations and services cannot be provided if students choose not to, or fail to, follow the established UCEAP procedures in a timely manner. Accommodations and services cannot be guaranteed and are individualized, based upon the student's documentation provided through the UC campus Disability Services Office (DSO). The letter must be on UC DSO letterhead and issued for the specific term and UCEAP program/country.  Accommodations and services can be revisited as needed, but they are not retroactive and cannot be facilitated, if available abroad, if procedures are not followed with reasonable, advanced notice.  It is the student's responsibility to ensure that any funding required for special services abroad is arranged in advance. For more information refer to the UCEAP Guide to Study Abroad, Students with Disabilities section.​

 

 

Local Transportation
The Hitotsubashi campus is in Kunitachi, located in a western suburb of Tokyo. Hitotsubashi is close to the train station and there is lots of activity in the Kunitachi area.  Kunitachi is on the rapid train line to go to the East side of Tokyo. The campus is about a 7 minute walk from the station. It is a nice area with restaurants including various international cuisines like Mexican, French and Nepalese food. The main road to campus is lined with cherry and oak trees and is extremely beautiful. The campus itself has a lot of trees and a pond. Many movies are filmed there.

 

 

Extracurricular Activities
 
 
Students with Disabilities
Travel Sign-out Form
 
Recreational Travel
 
Employment
 
Insurance
UCEAP Insurance
 
Mandatory Japanese National Health Insurance
 
Staying Healthy
Local Medical Facilities
Physical Health
 
Prescription Medications
 
Mental Health
 
Health Risks
Staying Safe
Minimize Risk
 
Crime & Prevention
 
Civil Unrest
Traffic & Transportation Safety
 
Earthquakes
 
UCEAP Contingency Plans
Fire Safety
 
In An Emergency
 
 
 
The University of California, in accordance with applicable Federal and State law and University policy, does not discriminate on the basis of race, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity, pregnancy,* disability, age, medical condition (cancer-related), ancestry, marital status, citizenship, sexual orientation, or status as a Vietnam-era veteran or special disabled veteran. The University also prohibits sexual harassment. This nondiscrimination policy covers admission, access, and treatment in University programs and activities. Inquiries regarding the University’s student-related nondiscrimination policies may be directed to the campus Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action office.

* Pregnancy includes pregnancy, childbirth, and medical conditions related to pregnancy or childbirth.